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Wholemeal Bread Pudding recipe


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This bread pudding recipe is to die for, and the wholemeal bit makes it healthy, right? Wholemeal bread is cut into cubes, soaked in milk and egg, then combined with raisins, mixed fruit and spices. Truly spectacular!

114 people made this

IngredientsServes: 12

  • 300g cubed wholemeal bread
  • 300ml milk
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 75g butter, softened
  • 125g sultanas or raisins
  • 40g mixed fruit
  • 110g dark brown soft sugar
  • 1 tablespoon ground nutmeg
  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:35min ›Ready in:45min

  1. Preheat oven to 190 C / Gas 5.
  2. In a large bowl, combine bread and milk, and set aside to soak for 5 minutes. Then stir in egg, butter, raisins, mixed fruit, dark brown soft sugar, nutmeg and cinnamon. Mix well. Press the mixture into a 23cm square baking tin.
  3. Bake in preheated oven until golden and firm to touch, about 35 minutes. Leave in baking pan to cool, then cut into squares.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(35)

Reviews in English (28)

I've used this a couple of times with variations.-02 Apr 2014

This recipe is delicious and it cooked perfectly. I used wholemeal bread ends and made breadcrumbs in a food processor and then added the milk which soaked in immediately. I then added the other ingredients and cooked for just over an hour. I added demerera sugar on the top whilst still warm which gives it a little crunch. I was delighted with the results.-28 Apr 2017

by Hayley C

Darvulya, Plum pudding, or christmas pudding as we brits call it is made from Suet and is steamed. This recipe IS the British Bread pudding that we all grew up on, smells and tastes fantastic. I also used left over cake (i carve and make Birthday cakes) If you are looking for that great stodgy heart warming dish you grew up on, bake this, sprinkle some sugar on top, grab a cuppa and enjoy. Thanks for taking the time to list this for us all to enjoy!!!-12 Oct 2008


Recipe of Award-winning Wholemeal Yorkshire puddings

Wholemeal Yorkshire puddings. A classic Yorkshire pudding batter would be made from Eggs, Flour, Milk and oil/butter. Whole Wheat Yorkshire puddings are wonderfully golden and crispy even though they are made with Whole Wheat Yorkshire Pudding. Clean Yorkshire Puddings, you make my life complete.

Yorkshire pudding is a common English side dish, a baked pudding made from a batter of eggs, flour, and milk or water. It is a versatile food that can be served in numerous ways depending on the choice. Yorkshire puddings should be fluffy and risen, with no undercooked or overly doughy sections Our foolproof way of making Yorkshire puddings every time is simply by using equal quantities by.

Hello everybody, it is Drew, welcome to our recipe site. Today, we’re going to prepare a distinctive dish, wholemeal yorkshire puddings. It is one of my favorites food recipes. For mine, I’m gonna make it a bit unique. This is gonna smell and look delicious.

Wholemeal Yorkshire puddings is one of the most well liked of current trending meals on earth. It is appreciated by millions every day. It is easy, it’s fast, it tastes delicious. Wholemeal Yorkshire puddings is something that I have loved my whole life. They’re fine and they look wonderful.

A classic Yorkshire pudding batter would be made from Eggs, Flour, Milk and oil/butter. Whole Wheat Yorkshire puddings are wonderfully golden and crispy even though they are made with Whole Wheat Yorkshire Pudding. Clean Yorkshire Puddings, you make my life complete.

To get started with this recipe, we have to first prepare a few ingredients. You can have wholemeal yorkshire puddings using 3 ingredients and 5 steps. Here is how you can achieve it.

The ingredients needed to make Wholemeal Yorkshire puddings:

  1. Prepare 2 of egss.
  2. Make ready 125 ml of milk.
  3. Get of Strong wholemeal flour as required.

I love Yorkshire puddings but I always used to buy them because I never even considered nor try and make them at home. How wrong was I not to try, wrong to not even consider trying. Roast Beef with Yorkshire puddings and gravy. Most people think Yorkshire puddings are too hard to make at home, but the recipe is actually very simple.

Steps to make Wholemeal Yorkshire puddings:

  1. Nothing special here. Add the eggs and milk and beat. Add flour until you have a smooth mix..
  2. Let the mix rest for at least an hour then beat again just before adding to the cooking tray..
  3. Add a teaspoon of olive oil to each muffin tray dimple. Heat in a hot oven until steaming..
  4. Pour the batter mix into the hot oil. Do not overfill. Cook for 25-30 minutes on hot (gas 7).
  5. Remove from tray and enjoy..

There are just a few things you need to get right first to ensure that your Yorkshire puds are. Roast beef just isn't the same without Yorkshire Pudding. It is not often that I cook roast beef so when I do, I just have to make Yorkshire pudding as they compliment the meal beautifully. This bread pudding recipe is to die for, and the wholemeal bit makes it healthy, right? Wholemeal bread is cut into cubes, soaked in milk and egg, then combined with raisins, mixed fruit and spices.

So that’s going to wrap it up for this exceptional food wholemeal yorkshire puddings recipe. Thank you very much for your time. I’m sure that you can make this at home. There’s gonna be more interesting food in home recipes coming up. Remember to bookmark this page on your browser, and share it to your family, friends and colleague. Thanks again for reading. Go on get cooking!


Bread & Butter Baker Isabel Pasch's 48-Hour Loaf

Regardless of which flour you use, making it yourself means you control what goes into your bread.

48-HOUR LOAF RECIPE

325g wholemeal wheat flour
325g strong white bread flour
420g water (at 22C)
13g salt
13g butter or vegetable oil
3g active dry yeast
20g brown sugar or other sweetener such as honey, maple syrup, date syrup, etc

1. Mix all ingredients in a kitchen mixer fitted with a dough hook for 5 minutes on the lowest setting and then 5 minutes on medium speed.

2. Leave to ferment for 90 minutes at a room temperature of about 20C. Stretch and fold the dough every 30 minutes, shaping into a ball with all ends tucked into the underside.

3. Place the dough into a bowl, cover with a damp tea towel and place in the fridge for 48 hours. If it rises too fast, take it out after 24 hours, knock it back and put back in the fridge.

4. After 48 hours, take the dough out of the fridge. Shape it into a ball and place it, folded ends up, into a flour-dusted bread-leavening basket or a bowl lined with a flour-dusted tea towel. Bring to room temperature (this takes approximately 90 minutes).

5. Heat oven to 250C. Place a roasting pan in the bottom of the oven.

6. Tip the loaf out of the bowl/basket on to a baking sheet and cut your favourite pattern into the top.

7. Place the sheet with the loaf in the middle of the oven. Toss a cup of boiling water into the roasting pan in the bottom of the oven and quickly close the door. Reduce the temperature immediately to 210C. Bake for 45 minutes.


Wholemeal Summer Pudding Recipe

If you think eating Whole Grain is boring - think again! Try this beautiful wholemeal summer pudding. NOTE - this recipe needs to be left overnight before serving.

Prep Time

Cook Time

Serves

Cost Per Serving

Nutrition Per Serving

Calories

Calories are a measure of the amount of energy in food and drink. Your weight depends on the balance between how much energy you consume and how much energy you use up. If you eat or drink more than you use you can gain weight. If you don’t eat enough you can lose it.

Your body wouldn’t function without fat. Fat is an essential part of a healthy balanced diet. It provides fat soluble vitamins and essential fatty acids. But as fat is a rich source of energy (calories), it can easily contribute to weight gain.

Carbs

Starchy foods like bread, breakfast cereals or potatoes are a good source of carbohydrate and should make up just over a third of the food you eat. When eaten, carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is used to fuel cells in your body like brain and muscle cells. Some people think starchy carbohydrates are fattening, but gram for gram it contains less than half the calories of fat. Choose whole grain or high fibre varieties where you can as they often contain more nutrients.

Sugars

On average in the UK we eat too much sugar. Foods and drinks high in sugars are not needed in the diet. So if you have them, make sure they're infrequent and in small amounts, or you risk tooth decay or obesity.

Fibre

Fibre is classed as a carbohydrate and you should aim to eat 30g fibre each day. Eating plenty of fibre is good for your digestive health and is associated with a lower risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and some cancers.

Protein

All cells and tissues contain protein, so it’s essential for growth, repair and good health. Protein from animal sources such as meat, fish, eggs and dairy products contain all the essential amino acids (the building blocks of protein) needed by the body. If you're vegetarian or vegan, you can get the protein you need through eating a variety of different plant sources such as pulses, nuts and cereals.

A small amount of salt is needed in your diet but too much can raise your blood pressure, which increases risk of health problems such as heart disease and stroke. Adults shouldn’t eat more than about 1 teaspoon (6g) per day – and that includes salt already in the foods you eat, not just the salt you add, so check nutrition labels on food packs.

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Wholemeal Bread, Chive & Cheshire Pudding Recipe

Calories are a measure of the amount of energy in food and drink. Your weight depends on the balance between how much energy you consume and how much energy you use up. If you eat or drink more than you use you can gain weight. If you don’t eat enough you can lose it.

Your body wouldn’t function without fat. Fat is an essential part of a healthy balanced diet. It provides fat soluble vitamins and essential fatty acids. But as fat is a rich source of energy (calories), it can easily contribute to weight gain.

Saturates

On average as a nation it seems we’re consuming too much saturated fat. Eating too much can increase your cholesterol, which is a risk factor for heart disease. Replacing saturated fats with unsaturated fats can help maintain healthy cholesterol levels, and reduce the risk of heart disease.

Carbs

Starchy foods like bread, breakfast cereals or potatoes are a good source of carbohydrate and should make up just over a third of the food you eat. When eaten, carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is used to fuel cells in your body like brain and muscle cells. Some people think starchy carbohydrates are fattening, but gram for gram it contains less than half the calories of fat. Choose whole grain or high fibre varieties where you can as they often contain more nutrients.

Sugars

On average in the UK we eat too much sugar. Foods and drinks high in sugars are not needed in the diet. So if you have them, make sure they're infrequent and in small amounts, or you risk tooth decay or obesity.

Fibre

Fibre is classed as a carbohydrate and you should aim to eat 30g fibre each day. Eating plenty of fibre is good for your digestive health and is associated with a lower risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and some cancers.

Protein

All cells and tissues contain protein, so it’s essential for growth, repair and good health. Protein from animal sources such as meat, fish, eggs and dairy products contain all the essential amino acids (the building blocks of protein) needed by the body. If you're vegetarian or vegan, you can get the protein you need through eating a variety of different plant sources such as pulses, nuts and cereals.

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(2)
  • 8 slices raisin loaf
  • 1tsp grated lemon rind
  • 55g/2oz raisins
  • 3 eggs
  • 300ml/½ pt double cream
  • 150ml/¼ pt milk
  • 55g/2oz caster sugar
  • 2tbsp rum or brandy

Preheat oven to 170°C (325°F, gas mark 3). Butter four small ovenproof dishes, about 300ml/½ pt each.

Spread the raisin bread slices with butter and cut each slice into four pieces.

Divide half the bread pieces between the dishes, sprinkle with the raisins and lemon rind and top with the remaining pieces. Beat the eggs with the cream, milk, sugar and brandy.

Pour over the bread in each dish and leave to stand for 30mins. Bake for about 35mins, until set and the crust is golden.


Savoury Wholemeal Bread Pudding

Make do and mend. Waste not – want not. These old adages were a way of life 100 years ago and yet in just a couple of generations, we’ve lost our way.

Now we have fast fashion, sea-life drowning in plastic and mountains of food thrown away every year. It’s a sorry state of affairs and one that I’ve decided I no longer want to be a part of.

Since the beginning of the year I’ve made a real effort to live more deliberately. I’ve tried to shop with a conscience, buying quality and not quantity and I’ve been particularly committed to reducing our food waste.

When you buy ‘good food’, you want to eat it and not throw it away!

We love Robert’s Heroic Wholemeal and when we find ourselves needing to use it up quickly – this recipe comes to the rescue (see what I did there ?). Much as I’d love to have a date with a large pile of hot toast and butter, I’m sure you’ll agree that this is a far more elegant solution.

You Will Need

Blue Cheese (I use Stilton but if you don’t like blue cheese, Brie also works well)

250g good quality wholemeal bread

  • Melt 15g of of butter in a lidded pan.
  • Finely slice the onion and add to the pan. SprInkle with a little salt.
  • Replace the lid and cook on a low heat for 40 minutes. Then cook without the lid for about 10 minutes to allow the onion to caramelise.
  • Melt the remaining butter and allow to cool.
  • In a large bowl combine the melted butter, eggs and milk.
  • Snip in some fresh rosemary.
  • Tear up the bread and add it to the bowl.
  • Leave for around 10 minutes, until all the liquid has been absorbed.

  • Crumble in a little blue cheese.
  • Spread a thin layer of the bread mix into the bottom of an oven dish.
  • Cover with half of the caramelised onions, a sprinkling of blue cheese and some prosciutto torn into small pieces.

  • Add some freshly ground black pepper and fresh rosemary and then add another layer.
  • For the top layer of bread mixture, make sure you cover the edges and corners but if you want to leave little gaps elsewhere, that can look quite nice.
  • Bake at 180 for 45 minutes before reducing the temperature to 140

This is DELICIOUS! It’s delicious hot and it’s delicious cold ? and can be wrapped up for picnics and packed lunches. The top is lovely and crunchy and the onion, cheese and prosciutto create loose layers. It’s very hard to stop at one piece!


Savoury Wholemeal Bread Pudding

Make do and mend. Waste not – want not. These old adages were a way of life 100 years ago and yet in just a couple of generations, we’ve lost our way.

Now we have fast fashion, sea-life drowning in plastic and mountains of food thrown away every year. It’s a sorry state of affairs and one that I’ve decided I no longer want to be a part of.

Since the beginning of the year I’ve made a real effort to live more deliberately. I’ve tried to shop with a conscience, buying quality and not quantity and I’ve been particularly committed to reducing our food waste.

When you buy ‘good food’, you want to eat it and not throw it away!

We love Robert’s Heroic Wholemeal and when we find ourselves needing to use it up quickly – this recipe comes to the rescue (see what I did there ?). Much as I’d love to have a date with a large pile of hot toast and butter, I’m sure you’ll agree that this is a far more elegant solution.

You Will Need

Blue Cheese (I use Stilton but if you don’t like blue cheese, Brie also works well)

250g good quality wholemeal bread

  • Melt 15g of of butter in a lidded pan.
  • Finely slice the onion and add to the pan. SprInkle with a little salt.
  • Replace the lid and cook on a low heat for 40 minutes. Then cook without the lid for about 10 minutes to allow the onion to caramelise.
  • Melt the remaining butter and allow to cool.
  • In a large bowl combine the melted butter, eggs and milk.
  • Snip in some fresh rosemary.
  • Tear up the bread and add it to the bowl.
  • Leave for around 10 minutes, until all the liquid has been absorbed.

  • Crumble in a little blue cheese.
  • Spread a thin layer of the bread mix into the bottom of an oven dish.
  • Cover with half of the caramelised onions, a sprinkling of blue cheese and some prosciutto torn into small pieces.

  • Add some freshly ground black pepper and fresh rosemary and then add another layer.
  • For the top layer of bread mixture, make sure you cover the edges and corners but if you want to leave little gaps elsewhere, that can look quite nice.
  • Bake at 180 for 45 minutes before reducing the temperature to 140

This is DELICIOUS! It’s delicious hot and it’s delicious cold ? and can be wrapped up for picnics and packed lunches. The top is lovely and crunchy and the onion, cheese and prosciutto create loose layers. It’s very hard to stop at one piece!


A grain of truth and a delicious, healthy bread and butter pudding

This post is written in collaboration with Tip Top bakeries.

Image provided: L-R Graeme Cutler, Tip Top Marketing & Innovation Director, Dr Joanna McMillan, Dietician, Justine Cotter, Tip Top Marketing Manager, Michelle Broom, GLNC Nutrition Program Manager

Last week I was invited to the Tip Top bakery headquarters to hear about a new campaign they’re launching called ‘A grain of truth’. I also got to have a look inside one of their kitchens and see just how the bread is made. It was one of the most interesting and fun mornings I’ve had in a long time.

There have been so many myths surrounding bread for so long now that this campaign has been launched to set the record straight. Are breads really that bad for us?? Have much do we really need them as part of our balanced diet?? Which bread is best?? It’s no wonder we’re all confused (ok, well I have been anyway).

Dietician Dr Joanna McMilian was on hand to tell us exactly what the truth is behind bread and it’s place in our diet. I found her fascinating to listen to and I learnt so much. I also got up close in the kitchen and saw for myself EXACTLY how the breads at Tip Top were made. It was a real eye opener and really refreshing.

Image provided

These are a few things I learnt about bread (that I didn’t already know).

  1. There is no added sugar in bread in Australia.
  2. White flour is not bleached.
  3. Bread contains protein as well as carbohydrate.
  4. White bread still contains some fibre and nutrients.
  5. The darker in colour the bread the higher in fibre and nutrients it is.
  6. Vinegar is used to keep bread fresher for longer rather than preservatives (a good tip for when I’m baking my own bread).
  7. Bread is best stored in a cool, dark place like a bread box or at the back of the pantry NOT in the fridge.

Some of these might be really obvious, but I have for so long believed that white bread was the WORST thing you could eat or feed your kids! I always believed it had no nutritional value at all and was full of sugar. I still very rarely buy white bread but I was thrilled to be proved wrong about it. Especially as my Miss H will not eat any bread that has the slightest hint of grain in it. It’s been an uphill battle with her. I also used to avoid some smooth and soft wholemeal breads because I just assumed they were too similar to white bread. Poor kid – I’ve been making her eat ‘ yucky nutty bread’ for so long, when in actual fact a good wholemeal bread would have been perfectly fine. I’ve now started buying ‘Tip Tip’s The One’ in wholemeal and everyone loves it. It’s the perfect sandwich bread (especially for fussy kids) because its soft, smooth and still full of goodness.

Here is a cool little infographic to help you choose the right bread for your family.

Image provided by Tip Top

The biggest lesson I learnt was not to fear bread. It really is an essential part of a healthy balanced diet. Everything in moderation of course and with so many amazing breads on offer these days there really is something for everyone. There is lots more great information and some fabulous recipes on the “A grain of truth‘ website. Check it out for yourself.

On that note, here is the recipe for you of one of my all time favourite desserts – bread and butter pudding. I’ve made mine in the thermomix but you can just as easily make it without one. I’ve used coconut milk, coconut sugar and wholemeal bread, making it a great healthy alternative with a delicious coconut caramel flavour.


Sugar Free Bread & Butter Pudding

Ah, comfort food. Creamy, cosy, completely delicious. I enjoy this time of year for bowls full of nourishing meals and puddings, and I love coming up with low sugar, real food versions of classic comfort foods like lasagne or hot chocolate.

Bread & butter pudding has been a staple of British comfort food for a long long time. During a gap year spent in community, I was treated to our chef’s delicious version of the cheap leftovers meal over and over, and it never got old. It was far too yummy to become boring!

Although a bread & butter pudding is not often extremely high in sugar, it can have up to a whole day’s worth in one serving depending on who has made it. And the addition of a lot of dried fruit definitely doesn’t make it a low sugar choice. So I’ve played around just slightly with the sugar, dried fruit and flavours in a traditional bread & butter pudding to make this:

Fresh grapes, lightly sweetened sugar free orange-scented custard made with real eggs, milk and cream, wholemeal bread sprinkled with cinnamon, all baked to perfection in what truly sums up “real” comfort food for me.

In a real food lifestyle, this may still be a treat, but it’s a wholesome and fresh one that will fill and warm you and leave just a promise of Christmas lingering in your tastebuds. It’s a feast food that costs little, contains only the sugar in the fresh fruit and uses up bread destined for the bin. I call that a win.


Classic Bread Pudding with Vanilla Custard Sauce Recipe

Grease a baking pan with butter and set aside. Preheat oven to 180 degree C.

Take buns and cut into cubes and let them dry out sitting in the board for an hour or so.

Take milk, cream and butter in a sauce pan and heat it till the butter is melted.

Now take eggs, sugar and vanilla in a bowl and whisk well till combined.

Now add in the milk and cream mix and whisk well.

Now add bread cubes in this mix and let this sit for 30 mins or so.

Now pour this in baking pan, top with raisan and make sure it is immersed in the custard mix. Top with some more cubes of butter and sprinkle some sugar on top.

Now pop this in oven and bake for 35 to 40 mins. Remove it and set aside.

While it is cooking, make the custard, Take custard powder and sugar in a bowl, add some milk and mix into a smooth mix.

Heat milk in a sauce pan and bring it to a boil. Now reduce the flame and add in the custard mix and cook till it thickens.

Now remove it from stove and add in vanilla. Let it cool down, pour it into a jug and set aside.

When serving, scoop some pudding a serving plate, top with some custard sauce and serve.


Watch the video: Whole Wheat Bread Pudding. Guilt-Free Bread Pudding. Healthy and Tasty Recipes (November 2021).