Other

Parsley-Sage Matzo Balls


Ingredients

  • 5 tablespoons pareve stick margarine, melted
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped fresh Italian parsley
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh sage

Recipe Preparation

  • Whisk eggs in medium bowl until frothy. Whisk in melted margarine, salt, and pepper, then herbs. Gradually mix in matzo meal. Stir in club soda. Cover and chill batter until cold and firm, at least 2 hours and up to 1 day.

  • Line baking sheet with plastic wrap. Using wet hands and 1 heaping teaspoonful for each, shape batter into matzo balls. Arrange on prepared sheet.

  • Drop matzo balls into large pot of boiling salted water. Cover partially and reduce heat to medium. Simmer until matzo balls are tender, about 1 hour. Using slotted spoon, transfer matzo balls to clean baking sheet. DO AHEAD Can be made ahead. Let stand at room temperature 2 hours or cover and chill up to 1 day. Rewarm in soup before serving.

Recipe by Miriyam Glazer, Phyllis Glazer,Reviews Section

List of soups

This is a list of notable soups. Soups have been made since ancient times.

Some soups are served with large chunks of meat or vegetables left in the liquid, while others are served as a broth. A broth is a flavored liquid usually derived from boiling a type of meat with bone, a spice mix, or a vegetable mix for a period of time in a stock.

A potage is a category of thick soups, stews, or porridges, in some of which meat and vegetables are boiled together with water until they form a thick mush.

Bisques are heavy cream soups traditionally prepared with shellfish, but can be made with any type of seafood or other base ingredients. Cream soups are dairy based soups. Although they may be consumed on their own, or with a meal, the canned, condensed form of cream soup is sometimes used as a quick sauce in a variety of meat and pasta convenience food dishes, such as casseroles. Similar to bisques, chowders are thick soups usually containing some type of starch.

Coulis were originally meat juices, and now are thick purées.

Some soups are served only cold, and other soups can optionally be served cold.


Oma's Fabulous Matzo Ball Soup recipes

Place chicken in large bowl. Add boiling water to cover. Let stand 2 minutes drain well. Us. ( more )

Melt margarine in heavy large pot over medium heat. Add next 5 ingredients. Cover cook 10 m. ( more )

Preparation In a large stew pot, cook oil, celery, green pepper, red pepper, yellow onion, . ( more )

Prep: 90m Cook: 20m Servs: 10

Cold weather will bring your eating to soup. yes this hearty soup is perfect meal in a cold. ( more )

in a med pot saute the sausage .drain the extra oil. add the onion,garlic, carrot,sea salt. ( more )

This recipe looks daunting at first, but with two people doing every other step it?s really . ( more )

Combine chocolate, butter and water in top of double boiler (you can make a double boiler by. ( more )

Prep: 20m Cook: 40m Servs: 12

Now I think I am Frank Sinatra! No, I have been making these matzo balls since I don't know . ( more )

Mix butter or margarine and eggs together. Add salt and pepper to matzo meal, then combine . ( more )


How about a Dumpling, Dumplin’?

With the advent of Daring Cooks, it seems every entry at this rate will either be a Daring Bakers or Daring Cooks entry, especially considering that the posting date between each is two weeks. Regardless, it’s cooking and baking, two of my favorite things in the world..so what’s to complain about, right? I’ll still squeeze in non-DB and DC creations because…

I FINALLY GOT INTO THE KITCHEN AND COOKED!

I still have trouble retrieving and transferring stuff since I need to hold onto a walker or cane, and I still have a ways to go before I’m scuttling around the kitchen like a headless chicken, but hey, it’s a start. Once I’m a headless chicken again, you’ll see a lot more entries since my need to cook or bake can strike at any time, whether it be 8 am or 4 am.

I have to thank my new physical therapist, Dorothy, for all of this, since she has me working that knee like a candy factory machine, not to mention sweating like a pig in (the) heat! This woman is a hot drill sergeant, but in a good way. She could make a killing in work-out videos.

Now that I’ve gotten that out of the way, this month’s Daring Cooks challenge is something I’ve had a love affair with years..something I never fail to order when it’s Chinese take-out night, or at any Chinese or Japanese restaurant (gyoza for the latter). Dumplings, whether they be steamed or fried (potstickers), filled with pork, shrimp, veggies, or whatever they have on the menu that looks good

All in all it doesn’t matter because I crave them every which way, and it’s always the first thing I dig into. I especially love that first bite, trying to catch the juices squirting out so I don’t lose one tiny drop. Sheer heaven to me.

Now, I’m a heavy duty dumpling worshiper in general, whether it be spaetzle, chicken with noodley or puffy dumplings, matzo balls, gnocchi, gnudi, all of the above light or heavy..you name it, but Asian dumplings always send me over the moon.

The Fillings

Pork

Shrimp Mousse

5-Spice Caramel Apple

I’ve made homemade dumplings and potstickers before, but I always used the pre-made wonton or dumpling skins. For this month’s challenge, the challenge was to make the dough from scratch, knead it, let it rest, cut it, flatten it, roll it, fill it and pleat it. I’ve never been a great dumpling pleater most of my dumplings end up looking like little packets of cellulite. But this challenge turned me into a decent dumpling pleater, and now dumpling making with homemade dough is another technique I can add to my list.

I messed the crimping up on the left side of the finished dumpling above, but it was sealed perfectly, so it wasn’t a major issue.

The host of this month’s challenge is jen yu from use real butter. The fact that she’s one tough cookie and tells it like it is, NO BS, endears me to her blog – not to mention her amazing recipes and stunning photography. Because of that, instead of posting the full recipe, with two fillings, and step-by-step dough making, rolling and pleating instructions, I’m going to send you over to the entry in her blog that covers it all. She’ll have you mastering dumplings in no time with her clear and concise instructions, along with (again) gorgeous photos that’ll turn you into a dumpling/potsticker Queen/King before you can say dumpling!

Click on jen yu’s amazing dumpling/potsticker recipe and instructions for the whole shebang of dumpling perfection, and then some. But, come back here to try my 5-spice apple filling!

Pork Potstickers

Having said all that, since we were given creative freedom when it came to fillings, I will post or supply links to the fillings I used in my three dumpling preparations. I used jen’s delicious pork filling to make potstickers, and a fantastic recipe for Shrimp Mousse with White Truffle Oil by Ming Tsai, in which I added fresh chives from my little terrace garden, toasted sesame oil, and steamed them, serving them with a chili-garlic dipping sauce to add a little heat.The combination of shrimp mousse and the chili-garlic dipping sauce so reminded me of a Spanish dish I once had called Gambas Al Ajillo (Shrimp with Chili Garlic Oil). Yum. I must recreate it!

Of course, I had to make a dessert dumpling and deep fry it. I decided on a 5-spice caramel apple filling, which I served with a homemade Triple Cream Vanilla Brie Ice Cream. Geesh, with all the links to the recipes, it looks like the only recipe I’ll have to post is for my 5-spice caramel apple filling. Cool, less type and more room for my less than stellar photos!

Preparing to steam the shrimp mousse dumplings in the bamboo steamer. I ran out of homemade dumpling dough so I had to use some purchased dumpling wrappers which weren’t sticking that well, as you can see.


Although all three dumplings were spectacular, the shrimp mousse was so light and airy, that it was like biting into a delicious cloud of buttery, briny sea. If not for the truffle oil, chives and sesame oil, your palate might rise to your maxillary sinus as if you inhaled a bottle of Fizzy Lifting Drink. In fact, if you look at the cross-section photo in the chopsticks, you can barely see the filling against the steamed dough. Without the dabs of chili-garlic sauce/oil, you might not even see it at all. So delicate and fluffy (yes, fluffy), it’s almost invisible to the naked eye.

This mousse by Ming Tsai is a must try..and it rhymes.

Now I need to find some more things to talk about since this entry is more of a photo gallery than actual text entry, at this juncture. Let’s see, let’s see..OH, according to the Urban dictionary, there are many definitions for dumpling, some of which are quite a hoot. For instance, it can refer to someone who needs to take a poo. It also refers to dumpling as the aforementioned poo that won’t flush no matter how many times you try (I thought those were called floaters?). Interesting. “Hey, who left a dumpling in the toilet?”. Never heard that one..ever.

Sorry for the gross out I’m really grasping here.

Dumpling, apparently, is also a term used to describe a chubby kid with an emo type of personality. Great, a pessimistic potsticker. If my dumpling cries, it just means my filling was too watery, although I do like ’em nice and fat.

Geeesh, where do they come up with this stuff?

To me and most, a dumpling is either a doughy, yummy treat, or a term of affection, so I’ll record those two into my ‘DUH-Urban’ Dictionary. Wait, is that the dessert bell I hear? Ding Ding Ding! I now present you with sweet, caramel-y, spicy, deep fried goodness, along with a big, fat scoop of cool, creamy brie ice cream (trust me on this one, it just adds another level of creaminess, no strong cheese flavor) and more spicy caramel….

Mmmm…hot, crispy, sticky, gooey, and full of spiced caramel apples. This is a really fun take on your typical apple dumpling or fritter. I think all Chinese restaurants should add something like this to their dessert menu, along with the fortune cookies, almond cookies, green tea ice cream, and uhh, fried banana. What’s with the fried banana? How about wrapping those suckers up in some dumpling dough and frying them? Now that’s something I’d order! UPDATE: I just tried filling the dumplings wrappers with sweetened cream cheese and serving them with a blueberry sauce for cream cheese dumplings with blueberry sauce! Please try that!

In conclusion, this challenge was so enjoyable that I want to wrap, pleat, steam, fry etc, almost anything in a dumpling wrapper right now (watches kitty dash away with an extreme sense of urgency). Wow, does anyone remember the silly rumors about the meat they use in Chinese restaurants….?


Alternative passover recipes

Just saw this in the SF Chronicle.

I have clipped the recipes. The source of the recipes is the article below.

Cooking good!
Mero Cocinero Karimi

Adapted from Shira Levine. Jewish dietary laws forbid the consumption of bloody meat. Because livers are so bloody, they must be koshered with both salt and fire. Sauteing the livers, as in the recipe below, is not enough. So if you or any of your guests keep kosher, add the following step: Heat the broiler to high and cover a baking sheet with foil. Rinse and dry the livers thoroughly, sprinkle them with salt and spread them on the prepared pan. Broil them until they change color, 1-2 minutes per side. Then add them to the softened onions, and follow the rest of the recipe, making sure the livers are completely cooked through before you chop them.

2 tablespoons + 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/2 large onion, chopped
Kosher salt
Pinch or more red pepper flakes
1 pound chicken livers, rinsed and dried (see Note)
1/4 cup dry white wine
1 additional tablespoon wine or water
3 hard-boiled eggs, cut in quarters
Sea salt (optional)

Instructions: In a large (10- or 12-inch) skillet, heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil over medium high heat for 2 minutes. Add the onion, 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt and a pinch of red pepper flakes, lower the heat to medium, and cook until the onions are soft and have a little color, about 12 minutes.

Open a window and/or turn on the oven fan.

Raise the heat to high, and add the livers to the pan with 1 teaspoon kosher salt. Spread the livers in a single layer and brown them, about 2 minutes per side. Take the pan off the heat and add the wine. Turn the heat to medium, and return the pan to the burner scrape the bottom of the pan to release the brown bits. Simmer until the livers are cooked through, turning once, about 20 minutes (10 minutes or less if you broiled them first see introduction). If the pan dries out, add another tablespoon of wine or water and again scrape up the brown bits.

Transfer the livers and onions to a food processor with two of the hard-boiled eggs and two or three grinds of black pepper. With the motor running, pour in the remaining 1/4 cup of olive oil and mix until coarsely chopped (stop before you get a paste). Taste, and add more salt, pepper or red pepper flakes if the liver seems bland.

Chopped liver isn't an attractive food, so presentation is important: Transfer the liver to a shallow serving bowl. Push the remaining hard-boiled egg through a fine-mesh sieve, and sprinkle the sieved egg over the bowl, leaving a 1/2- to 1-inch ring of liver showing at the edge. Serve as an hors d'oeuvre with matzo crackers and, if you like, a little bowl of sea salt on the side: Its large granules and crisp saltiness contrast deliciously with the rich liver.

Note: Well-stocked supermarkets and butchers like Guerra's (490 Taraval St., at 15th Avenue, San Francisco 415-564-0585) and Drewes Bros. (1706 Church St., at 29th Street, San Francisco 415-821-0515) stock chicken livers, but it's always best to call a day or two ahead

To make ahead: Make the chopped liver up to one day ahead.

Per 2 tablespoons: 100 calories, 6 g protein, 2 g carbohydrate, 7 g fat (1 g saturated), 164 mg cholesterol, 201 mg sodium, 0 fiber.

Because this soup is richer than the chicken broth traditionally served with matzo balls, serve it in small bowls.

1 1/2 pounds carrots (about 5 or 6 large), peeled and cut on the diagonal into 1-inch-thick slices
1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon olive oil
-- Kosher or sea salt
4 tablespoons unsalted butter (see Note)
1 medium onion, chopped
1 large rib celery, thinly sliced
1/4 cup Madeira
6 cups chicken or vegetable stock
-- Freshly ground black pepper
-- Matzo Balls (see recipe)

Instructions: Preheat oven to 450°.

Toss the carrots with the olive oil and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Spread the carrots, cut side down, on a baking sheet so that none are touching (you may need to use two pans). Roast, turning once halfway through, until the carrots are browned and slightly blistered, about 20 minutes.

Melt the butter over medium-high heat in a Dutch oven or large heavy-bottom pot. When the butter starts to foam, add the onions, celery and 1/2 teaspoon salt and cook, stirring every 2 minutes or so, until the onions are soft and starting to color, about 10 minutes.

Add the roasted carrots and stir to coat with the butter and onions. Raise the heat to high, add the Madeira, and let it reduce for a minute. Add 4 cups of the stock, bring the soup to a boil, lower the heat, and simmer until the carrots are very tender, but not mushy, about 10 minutes.

Strain the solids from the liquids and puree the solids with 1 cup of the strained stock in a food processor (or with an immersion blender) until very smooth. Return the puree to the pot and thin it, adding a 1/2 cup of stock at a time. It should pour, not plop, from a wooden spoon, but should leave a thick film on the spoon. Season with a few grinds of black pepper and 1/2 teaspoon salt or more (if you use no-sodium chicken stock, you might need as much as a teaspoon of salt).

Serve hot with two matzo balls per person, or refrigerate overnight to let the flavors develop. The soup will thicken with time thin it with the rest of the stock (or water), adding a 1/2 cup at a time.

Note: To make this soup kosher for a meat meal, substitute 4 tablespoons of olive oil for the butter.

To make ahead: Like many soups, this is better the next day. Make it up to two days in advance but do not salt fully. Reheat when ready to serve and adjust seasonings.

Per serving: 195 calories, 5 g protein, 16 g carbohydrate, 12 g fat (5 g saturated), 22 mg cholesterol, 581 mg sodium, 4 g fiber.

Matzo Balls with Parsley & Sage

Adapted from Lindsay Braunig. This recipe makes light matzo balls. For heavier dumplings, use 3/4 cup of matzo meal. The denser batter only needs to chill for 1 hour, but might take longer to cook.

2 cold large eggs, beaten
2 tablespoons neutral tasting vegetable oil like grapeseed or peanut
Kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
1/3 cup chopped parsley
1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon chopped sage
1/2 cup matzo meal
2 tablespoons chicken stock or cold water

Instructions: Whisk together the eggs, oil, 1 teaspoon salt, two or three grinds black pepper and the herbs. Stir in the matzo meal until well combined. Stir in the stock or water. Cover and refrigerate until the mixture can hold its shape, about 2 hours.

Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil, and lower to a simmer. Wet a tablespoon and your hands to minimize stickiness. Measure out tablespoons of batter. Roll the batter between your palms to form balls. You might be tempted to make the matzo balls bigger don't. They expand when cooked.

Gently slide the dumplings into the simmering water. Cover the pot, and simmer the matzo balls until they're almost cooked through, about 1 1/2 hours. Cut one open to check: The dumplings should be the same light color almost to the core.

Strain and serve two per person in a bowl of roasted carrot soup, chicken broth or vegetable broth.

To make ahead: Cool the matzo balls at room temperature, then refrigerate for up to two days, stored in a single layer. Matzo balls also keep well: Freeze them on a tray, transfer to a freezer bag, and store for up to 1 month. Defrost in the fridge and reheat in simmering water.

Per serving: 45 calories, 3 g protein, 5 g carbohydrate, 2 g fat (0 saturated), 61 mg cholesterol, 326 mg sodium, 0 fiber.


Jewish penicillin: This soup is the cure for what ails you

Mom got her chicken soup recipe from her mom. It’s a simple, brothy affair with lots of dill, the kind of soup that’s popular throughout the Yiddish diaspora, often referred to half-jokingly as Jewish Penicillin, because it always makes you feel better, no matter what ails you.

Yiddish is the native tongue of the Ashkenazi Jews of Eastern Europe, is based mostly on German but also contains Russian and Slavic words and a Hebrew alphabet. It’s a culture as much as a language, with its own traditions, recipes, and history of struggle of a community that has always been more a state of mind than a nation with borders. Throughout our tumultuous history, chicken soup with dill remained a constant.

Mom, her mom and their foremothers have all helped carry the torch forward to this point, all but assuring it will continue into the next generation as my kids are fans of chicken dill soup. But there is one aspect of this tradition that won’t continue: the step where you put a raw chicken into a pot of water. The idea of boiling a raw chicken bothers me the way boiled hot dogs do. I have to brown it first. And if you try it once, you’ll never go back.

It began when I started bringing home rotisserie chicken from the supermarket, as a quick way to make soup. You put a greasy brown bird in a pot of water with some veggies, and by the time it’s hot the soup is done. I quickly realized that convenience wasn’t the only perk of “cheaters chicken soup,” as I called it.

I was pleased to taste the rich flavor those soft and juicy chickens gave to my soup, and decided to learn how to recreate that magic in my own oven. Turns out, roasting your own chicken requires little more than a chicken, and a sliver of foresight.

Alas, on a typical afternoon, by the time my thoughts turn to dinner it’s too late to roast a chicken. But If you give me a raw bird and 4-hours notice, I can brown it with the best of them. Anyone can, because it’s about as easy as turning the oven on and putting in the chicken.

In my house, by the time a browned chicken makes it into the soup pot it looks like it’s been accosted by piranhas, and that’s OK. The carrion crows posing as my children are part of the plan, because I roast a six-pound bird, which leaves plenty of meat left over for soup, even after feeding us dinner. My kids are trained to save their bones, which I collect after dinner, smashing them with a frying pan to release their marrow. I use the broken, browned bones make a lusty bone stock.

My soup isn’t clear like Mom’s. The rich, murky broth hides the chunks, including the tomatoes and potatoes I sneak in, breaking further from tradition. But even in my relatively busy and rebellious bowl of soup, the dominant dill flavor remains.

I roast my chicken with an herb or mix of herbs like Italian seasonings, harissa, herbes de Provence, parsley, sage, rosemary, thyme. When browning a bird for Jewish Penicillin, the herb might as well be dill.

1 tablespoon garlic powder

1/2-cup dried dill (or 3 ounces chopped fresh dill)

2 medium-sized Potatoes, cut into quarters

4 cloves of smashed garlic

2 sticks of celery, chopped in ½-inch pieces

2 medium sized carrots, cut into 1/2-inch coins

Rinse the chicken and let it dry — or dry it with a towel. Place the seasoned bird in a deep pan large enough that the chicken doesn’t quite touch the sides of the pan. Rub it with the olive oil, salt, pepper, garlic powder and dill. In a medium-sized mixing bowl, rub the remaining oil and spices on the potatoes, garlic, onions, celery and any organ or neck meat that came with the bird, and stuff it all into the cavity. Place any veggies that don’t fit around the bird.

Bake uncovered, breast-side down, at 325 degrees for 3 hours (or one hour per two pounds of bird), turning over at once for the last 45 minutes.

That night for dinner, enjoy some oven-browned chicken and juicy vegetables from the cavity. After dinner, strip all the remaining meat off of the bones and cut it into bite-sized chunks for use in the soup.

As for the bones, break or cut them if possible, to let out the marrow. Boil the bones for as long as you can, covered. I use a pasta boiler with the broken bones in the insert so I can easily remove them when it’s time — which it isn’t quite. Turn off the before getting ready for bed, so that the pot is cool enough to put in the fridge, bones and all, before you turn in for the night.

The next morning, strain the bones out and skim as much fat as you care to, and return the broth to the fridge until it’s time to make zup, as we say in Yiddish.

1 3-lb raw chicken or the leftovers of a 6-lb roasted chicken and its accompanying broth

1 cup dry dill, a bunch of fresh dill, chopped

1 tablespoon salt, more to taste

My additions: 1 pound of potatoes (Mom would use matzo balls), and ½ lb chopped tomatoes for acid (other cooks might add a touch of lemon juice or vinegar)

If starting with a raw chicken: cut it into pieces and simmer in 8 quarts of water with a tablespoon of salt for two hours. Skim some fat, or not.

If starting with yesterday’s chicken, add the leftover chicken meat to the broth you made from your broken, browned bones. Also add any remaining cavity vegetables.

Add the vegetables to the cooked chicken and broth, and simmer for an hour. Adjust salt and dill to taste.


Oven-Browned Chicken

I roast my chicken with an herb or mix of herbs, such as Italian seasoning, harissa, herbes de Provence, parsley, sage, rosemary, or thyme. When browning a bird for Jewish penicillin, the herb might as well be dill.

  • 1 6-pound chicken
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 tablespoon garlic powder
  • 1 cup dried dill (or 1 ounce chopped fresh dill)
  • 2 medium-sized potatoes, cut into quarters
  • 4 cloves garlic, smashed
  • 1 onion, quartered
  • 2 sticks celery, chopped in 1/2-inch pieces

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F.

Rinse the chicken and let it dry, or dry it with a towel. Rub it with the olive oil, salt, pepper, garlic powder, and dill. Use the remaining oil and spices on the potatoes, garlic, onion, celery, and any organ or neck meat that came with the bird, and stuff it all into the cavity.

Place the seasoned bird in a deep pan large enough that the chicken doesn’t quite touch the sides. Bake uncovered at 325 degrees F for 3 hours (or 1 hour per 2 pounds of bird), turning over at least once, so both sides, especially the breast, which might dry out, get to bask in the juices.

That night for dinner, enjoy some oven-browned chicken and juicy vegetables from the cavity.

After dinner, strip all the remaining meat off of the bones and cut it into bite-sized chunks for use in the soup.

As for the bones, break or cut them if possible, to let out the marrow. Boil the bones for as long as you can, covered. I use a pasta boiler with the broken bones in the insert so I can easily remove them when it’s time—which it isn’t quite. Turn off the heat before getting ready for bed, so that the pot is cool enough to put in the fridge, bones and all, before you turn in for the night.

The next morning, strain the bones out and skim as much fat as you care to, and return the broth to the fridge until it’s time to make zup, as we say in Yiddish.


Parsley-Sage Matzo Balls - Recipes

Only once have we hosted Thanksgiving at our house and it was spectacular. At the time, Mark was our home's main cook and I was the dishwasher.

Several years ago, I decided I needed to learn how to cook if I wanted to eat the way I want. So I committed to cooking dinner every night during one whole school year. I successfully managed to do it more or less. Everything seemed daunting at first and then it just got easier. While Mark is a natural, I'm a self-taught novice who still gets nervous when someone asks me to bring a dish to their house. Making chicken soup with a whole chicken , turning on the grill or roasting a turkey were high up on my list of things that I found seriously scary.

My mom also has some serious kitchen chops. Her famous lasagna, brisket, matzo balls, sweet potatoes with marshmallows, rum cake and turkey stuffing can't be replicated. Her love and energy is in it. So I tried my best to make a gluten free stuffing based on my love of (her and) hers. Mark gave it the thumbs up! Cue heel kick here!

As for the turkey, I have honestly only cooked whole birds a couple times, but how hard could a turkey breast be? Feeling confident, I began this dinner at 5pm on a Thursday night thinking it would be done in an hour. It was more like 90 minutes, and I even made gravy on the fly. My kitchen was wrecked, but it gave me another boost of confidence that when it's our turn to host Thanksgiving again, I'll be the one cooking and Mark will be the one washing dishes. Cue dish towel whip here!

Note on timing and ovens: Set oven to high broil first with rack on highest level to toast bread. After all the bread is toasted, lower rack to bottom 1/3 of oven and set temp to 450º on bake for the turkey. You will need a second oven to cook the stuffing at the same time.

1.5 loaf of Udi&rsquos White Sandwich Gluten Free Bread

1 small fennel, chopped bulb only with core removed

3 links Amylu's Italian sausage or other clean-sourced sweet Italian sausage, casings removed (sausage is optional), sliced or crumbled

2 T butter or 2 T olive oil - to coat bread

2 large eggs, lightly beaten

1 cup low sodium chicken broth

1/2 cup full fat coconut milk

2 T fresh flat-leaf parsley

2 T fresh sage (My son says sage tastes like a candle so I might leave it out for him the next time. Not sure when he ate a candle, but OK.)

Lightly butter or oil each side of bread.

Broil bread on baking sheet until brown/toasted, 2 minutes. Flip to other side and broil again for 2 minutes.

Allow bread to cool completely on a wire rack.

Cut bread into pieces and place in large bowl.

Combine parsley, sage, salt and pepper in small bowl.

Heat 1/4 cup olive over medium high heat add onions and sauté until softened.

Add fennel and celery, stirring occasionally until vegetables are soft.

Add sausage, sauté until heated through (optional)

Transfer vegetables (and sausage) to bowl with the toasted bread.

Add eggs, stock, coconut milk and gently toss.

Transfer mixture to a glass baking dish, prepped with olive oil spray or butter.

Bake, covered, in middle of oven for 30 minutes.

Uncover to brown top, bake for an additional 20 minutes.

TIME: 90 minutes with cook time

4.5 pounds whole turkey breast, bone-in and skin-on

1 tablespoon butter melted or extra-virgin olive oil

Place oven rack on lowest third of oven. Preheat oven to 450º.

Place a wire rack in a rimmed baking sheet.

Place the breast on the rack on the baking sheet and allow to warm to room temp while you're busy toasting the bread for the stuffing.

Pat breast dry with a paper towel.

Using a basting brush, brush turkey with butter or oil, get under the skin where you can.

Rub salt and pepper all over turkey and under skin.

Place turkey in oven and turn oven temp down to 350º.

Check turkey temp at one hour. Meat will read 165º when it's done. If you have to cook longer than an hour, place foil over turkey to prevent skin from getting too crispy.

When done, remove from oven and cover with foil. Let rest for 15 minutes. Carve starting at top of breastbone down until full breast is removed. Slice turkey on the bias (on an angle).

Pour drippings from baking sheet into a small pot. Add roughly 1 cup chicken stock, 1 T butter and 1 T arrowroot. Whisk on a low heat. If it gets lumpy, add more stock. Strain through a fine mesh sieve.


Dill Point in a Turning World

M om got her chicken soup recipe from her mom. It's a simple, brothy affair with lots of dill, the kind of soup that's popular throughout the Yiddish diaspora, often referred to half-jokingly as Jewish Penicillin, because it always makes you feel better, no matter what ails you.

Yiddish is the native tongue of the Ashkenazi Jews of Eastern Europe, is based mostly on German but also contains Russian and Slavic words and a Hebrew alphabet. It's a culture as much as a language, with its own traditions, recipes and history of struggle of a community that has always been more a state of mind than a nation with borders. Throughout our tumultuous history, chicken soup with dill remained a constant.

  • Ari LeVaux
  • This soup begins with a home-roasted chicken. so much more appetizing than the boiled chicken recipies of yore.

Mom, her mom and their foremothers have all helped carry the torch forward to this point, all but assuring it will continue into the next generation as my kids are fans of chicken dill soup. But there is one aspect of this tradition that won't continue: the step where you put a raw chicken into a pot of water. The idea of boiling a raw chicken bothers me the way boiled hot dogs do. I have to brown it first. And if you try it once, you'll never go back.

It began when I started bringing home rotisserie chicken from the supermarket, as a quick way to make soup. I was pleased to taste the rich flavor those soft and juicy chickens gave to my soup, and decided to learn how to recreate that magic in my own oven. Turns out, roasting your own chicken requires little more than a chicken, and a sliver of foresight.

Alas, on a typical afternoon, by the time my thoughts turn to dinner it's too late to roast a chicken. But if you give me a raw bird and 4 hours' notice, I can brown it with the best of them. Anyone can, because it's about as easy as turning the oven on and putting in the chicken.

Enjoying this story?

We depend on your support to help fund our coverage. Support local, independent media with a small monthly or one time contribution. Thank you!

In my house, by the time a browned chicken makes it into the soup pot it looks like it's been accosted by piranhas, and that's OK. The carrion crows posing as my children are part of the plan, because I roast a 6-pound bird, which leaves plenty of meat left over for soup, even after feeding us dinner. My kids are trained to save their bones, which I collect after dinner, smashing them with a frying pan to release their marrow. I use the broken, browned bones to make a lusty bone stock.

My soup isn't clear like Mom's. The rich, murky broth hides the chunks, including the tomatoes and potatoes I sneak in, breaking further from tradition. But even in my relatively busy and rebellious bowl of soup, the dominant dill flavor remains.

1 6-lb chicken
¼ cup olive oil
3 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon pepper
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1/2-cup dried dill (or 3 ounces chopped fresh dill)
2 medium-sized Potatoes, cut into quarters
4 cloves of smashed garlic
1 onion, quartered
2 sticks of celery, chopped in ½-inch pieces
2 medium sized carrots, cut into 1/2-inch coins

Rinse the chicken and let it dry — or dry it with a towel. Place the seasoned bird in a deep pan large enough that the chicken doesn't quite touch the sides of the pan. Rub it with the olive oil, salt, pepper, garlic powder and dill. In a medium-sized mixing bowl, rub the remaining oil and spices on the potatoes, garlic, onions, celery and any organ or neck meat that came with the bird, and stuff it all into the cavity. Place any veggies that don't fit around the bird.

Bake uncovered, breast-side down, at 325 degrees for 3 hours (or one hour per 2 pounds of bird), turning over at once for the last 45 minutes.

That night for dinner, enjoy some oven-browned chicken and juicy vegetables from the cavity. After dinner, strip all the remaining meat off of the bones and cut it into bite-sized chunks for use in the soup.

As for the bones, break or cut them if possible, to let out the marrow. Boil the bones for as long as you can, covered. I use a pasta boiler with the broken bones in the insert so I can easily remove them when it's time —which it isn't quite. Turn off the stovetop before getting ready for bed, so that the pot is cool enough to put in the fridge, bones and all, before you turn in for the night.

The next morning, strain the bones out and skim as much fat as you care to, and return the broth to the fridge until it's time to make zup, as we say in Yiddish.

My additions: 1 pound of potatoes (Mom would use matzo balls), and ½ lb chopped tomatoes for acid (other cooks might add a touch of lemon juice or vinegar)

If starting with a raw chicken: cut it into pieces and simmer in 8 quarts of water with a tablespoon of salt for two hours. Skim some fat, or not.

If starting with yesterday's chicken, add the leftover chicken meat to the broth you made from your broken, browned bones. Also add any remaining cavity vegetables.

Add the vegetables to the cooked chicken and broth, and simmer for an hour. Adjust salt and dill to taste.


Ball Sage Recipes

  • Mini Pumpkin Sage Balls

A 5-pound pumpkin sitting on the kitchen counter inspired Mian Catalano, a .

The chicken and vegetables are strained out for a clear soup. If you'd like .

This classic soup gets a bright touch from lemon juice.

A simple, yet delicious appetiser, that is sure to wow your guests at your .

These baked pumpkin balls will really impress company sprinkled with fried .

A n Appetizer recipe for Pumpkin and Fresh Sage Balls

These parsley and sage matzo balls are light and elegant.

This is good as main dish, snacks ,appetizers or whatever. It has a delicio .

Thousands of Cuisinart Recipes

Gorgonzola Sage Cheese Ball

Aunt Beth's Sage Dressing Balls

Saute onions 10 min, add garlic and chopped sage, saute 2 min more. Mix al .


Watch the video: The Dangling Conversation (November 2021).