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Ireland's Castlewood House Dingle Gets Personal Within its Four-Star Property


Outside, a strawberry and cream-colored fishing boat bobs gently in the lapping waters of Dingle Bay; such is the picturesque southwest Ireland location of Castlewood House Dingle. Brian Heaton, an experienced Irish hotel manager, opened this charming guest house eight years ago with his wife, Helen, just outside the pretty Kerry town of Dingle. The couple met fresh out of college while working at the five-star Ashford Castle in County Mayo.

Aside from the various planning permissions that took twice as long as the actual construction, it is difficult to believe the couple completed this graceful building from scratch within ten months. Upon entering through a sturdy, black-painted wood front door with brass handles, the property’s elegance is more than evident. Inside, a small hallway with natural slate floor, paintings decorating its walls, fresh flowers, and a white wicker basket containing Irish woolen shawls for guest use decorate the interior.

The spacious main lobby reinforces the sense of sophistication, fitted with a thick crimson carpet, its furnishings include a central varnished yew table and mahogany and rosewood side tables, upholstered Victorian and Edwardian-era armchairs, and evocative oil paintings by Helen’s mother. A small reception desk lies straight ahead with a decanter of sherry and crystal glasses on a side-table as a welcome drink. On either side of the lobby are an airy breakfast room and a cozy, walnut-floored drawing room with a gilt-framed oil painting featuring Helen’s parents and farmhands erecting a haystack.

Reading materials are plentiful, with morning newspapers and novels on shelves ranging from Margaret Mitchell’s classic Gone With the Wind to Dubliner Roddy Doyle’s The Snapper. Complimentary tea and coffee are available as well as homemade scones and biscuits purchased through an honesty bar, with payment made upon departure.

Breakfast at Castlewood is sheer bliss, with Brian as connoisseur and composer, self-taught and aided by years of observance in hotel management. The impressive cold buffet includes cereals, a variety of fruits, three different types of yogurt including a passion fruit variety, delicious homemade pastries and a delectable passion fruit curd (yes, I do like passion fruit – isn’t it a crime not to?). Fifteen separate hot choices are featured on the menu ranging from the fluffiest of pancakes with a mascarpone creamy cheese accompaniment to a perfectly moist Cashel blue cheese and mushroom omelet and Eggs Benedict Supreme with local organic salmon and chives. Other picks include Dingle Bay kippers, a traditional Irish plate with sausages, black pudding, bacon and eggs and bagel supreme with salmon and cheese.

Up a winding balustrade to the first floor, our compact yet comfortable guestroom was tastefully decorated with a series of old–world prints of beautiful, dusky- haired women. The furniture is Plantation-style with a large double-door closet, two cabinets, two corner armchairs, a round glass-topped table and Wedgewood cups and saucers. An interesting addition to the well-being of guests is the complimentary Pi water — water, similar to the consistency of your own body water — that enhances living energy.

Aside from Castlewood’s relaxing location facing the bay, it also lies within a leisurely ten-minute walk to town, as well as beside the start of what is known as Slea Head Drive. Slea Head Drive is a looping coastal road that winds through some beautiful scenery, both from cliff and beach viewing points. Ancient archaeological sites including ring forts and stone beehive dwellings, interesting art and pottery stores can all be seen along the route. Dingle also offers many entertainment options such as live music (mainly traditional) in its many bars (one quaint bar serves as both a hardware store and pub), as well as souvenir and clothes stores, cafés and restaurants.

Of particular note along the way is the Celtic and Prehistoric Museum established by Connecticut-born hammer-dulcimer maestro Harris Moore who collected a wide variety of impressive artifacts during his many travels. These include the skull of a woolly mammoth fished out of the North Sea; a complete baby dinosaur skeleton; tools, weapons and other artifacts from the Jurassic, Stone, and Bronze ages and an outstanding collection of Celtic jewelry from the Viking and Celtic eras. A shop within the museum sells fossils, crafts, antiques and other unusual gifts.

A 45-minute drive from Castlewood is Kerry’s capital town, Tralee, home to Siamsa Tire National Folk Theatre of Ireland which hosts performances year-round. Along with Siamsa, Kerry County Museum brings to life the story of the area from the earliest times to the present day.

Castlewood House Dingle’s personal touches and their attention to detail make it a great stay for the discerning traveler seeking an intimate four-star property. The boutique property offers a wealth of history behind its doors and a number of activities to keep guests entertained or can assist with custom itineraries for exploring the Ireland countryside.


Health & Beauty

A sponsored post for Full Body Workhouse appeared on Facebook stated:
Free 6 week challenge
I’m looking for 40 ladies who are looking to transform their bodies and lives in 6 weeks for FREE.”
A link to a website was provided and also included was a video of a member of the gym and a ‘sign up’ button.

“Why? Simple – I am looking to market my facility and use the testimonials from this program to get more clients. AND – because when I have done this program in the past most people stay on afterwards to become members because they love our facility so much. Consider yourself warned!!
What you get:
Personal custom meal plan to eliminate guesswork
Personal grocery list to save time and money and make it crazy easy
Personal food prep instructions so easy my 12 year old can do it in under 2 hours/wk
42 Done-For-You recipes to follow for the 6 weeks so you never have to ask yourself “what am I going to make tonight?”
Personal accountability coach so it feels like you have a motivated speaker waking you up every morning to get your behind in the gym
3 cutting edge workouts PER WEEK WITH ME AT MY GYM designed to tone your body and jump start your metabolism and give you an explosion of energy.
World class online support group with 24hrs accountability
And much much more….

That being said, this is for MOTIVATED…..”

The complainant viewed the advertisement and signed up for their assessment. When visiting the gym she was advised that she would have to pay €499 to avail of the challenge and lose 4lbs a week for the 6 weeks, i.e. 25lbs in total. As none of this information was contained within the sponsored post she considered it was misleading.

The advertiser said that they run a 6 week challenge from their gym that was launched on Facebook by video and word content. They said that after viewing the video and reading all the content, people are asked if they want to find out more. If they do then they need to click the link within the advert and they then arrive at a landing page where they are told they can register for free.

They said that when consumers register they are brought through a booking service in order to set up a time and day for a free private consultation at their gym. They said that the private consultation consists of an explanation for approximately 25 – 30 minutes about the program, including details of the nutrition plan, recipes, accountability, training, weekly measurements, targets of 25lbs or 6% body fat and cost etc. They said that therefore everyone was in no doubt of what the programme entailed in every aspect before starting.

They said that the challenge itself was based on the individual and if someone had more weight to lose they set them a target of 25lbs or if they have not, then their target was 6% body fat as they have to be realistic for them to achieve their goal in the 6 weeks. They also said that as they really want to motivate them, they offered their money back when they hit their target. They said that they currently had 20 people taking part in the challenge and they would be refunding some members who had achieved their goal.

The Complaints Committee considered the detail of the complaint and the advertisers’ response. The Committee noted that the sponsored post on Facebook had specifically referred to the 6 week challenge as being ‘Free’, explaining that it would generate testimonials for the gym The noted however that it was actually a ‘money-back’ offer dependent on achieving a goal, rather than an unconditional ‘free’ offer. They noted that this was not clear from the advertising, with the complainant only being made aware of the terms when attending the initial consultation at the gym. In the circumstances the Committee considered that the advertising was likely to mislead and in breach of Sections 4.1 and 4.4 of the Code.

ACTION REQUIRED:
The advertising must not reappear in its current form.


Health & Beauty

A sponsored post for Full Body Workhouse appeared on Facebook stated:
Free 6 week challenge
I’m looking for 40 ladies who are looking to transform their bodies and lives in 6 weeks for FREE.”
A link to a website was provided and also included was a video of a member of the gym and a ‘sign up’ button.

“Why? Simple – I am looking to market my facility and use the testimonials from this program to get more clients. AND – because when I have done this program in the past most people stay on afterwards to become members because they love our facility so much. Consider yourself warned!!
What you get:
Personal custom meal plan to eliminate guesswork
Personal grocery list to save time and money and make it crazy easy
Personal food prep instructions so easy my 12 year old can do it in under 2 hours/wk
42 Done-For-You recipes to follow for the 6 weeks so you never have to ask yourself “what am I going to make tonight?”
Personal accountability coach so it feels like you have a motivated speaker waking you up every morning to get your behind in the gym
3 cutting edge workouts PER WEEK WITH ME AT MY GYM designed to tone your body and jump start your metabolism and give you an explosion of energy.
World class online support group with 24hrs accountability
And much much more….

That being said, this is for MOTIVATED…..”

The complainant viewed the advertisement and signed up for their assessment. When visiting the gym she was advised that she would have to pay €499 to avail of the challenge and lose 4lbs a week for the 6 weeks, i.e. 25lbs in total. As none of this information was contained within the sponsored post she considered it was misleading.

The advertiser said that they run a 6 week challenge from their gym that was launched on Facebook by video and word content. They said that after viewing the video and reading all the content, people are asked if they want to find out more. If they do then they need to click the link within the advert and they then arrive at a landing page where they are told they can register for free.

They said that when consumers register they are brought through a booking service in order to set up a time and day for a free private consultation at their gym. They said that the private consultation consists of an explanation for approximately 25 – 30 minutes about the program, including details of the nutrition plan, recipes, accountability, training, weekly measurements, targets of 25lbs or 6% body fat and cost etc. They said that therefore everyone was in no doubt of what the programme entailed in every aspect before starting.

They said that the challenge itself was based on the individual and if someone had more weight to lose they set them a target of 25lbs or if they have not, then their target was 6% body fat as they have to be realistic for them to achieve their goal in the 6 weeks. They also said that as they really want to motivate them, they offered their money back when they hit their target. They said that they currently had 20 people taking part in the challenge and they would be refunding some members who had achieved their goal.

The Complaints Committee considered the detail of the complaint and the advertisers’ response. The Committee noted that the sponsored post on Facebook had specifically referred to the 6 week challenge as being ‘Free’, explaining that it would generate testimonials for the gym The noted however that it was actually a ‘money-back’ offer dependent on achieving a goal, rather than an unconditional ‘free’ offer. They noted that this was not clear from the advertising, with the complainant only being made aware of the terms when attending the initial consultation at the gym. In the circumstances the Committee considered that the advertising was likely to mislead and in breach of Sections 4.1 and 4.4 of the Code.

ACTION REQUIRED:
The advertising must not reappear in its current form.


Health & Beauty

A sponsored post for Full Body Workhouse appeared on Facebook stated:
Free 6 week challenge
I’m looking for 40 ladies who are looking to transform their bodies and lives in 6 weeks for FREE.”
A link to a website was provided and also included was a video of a member of the gym and a ‘sign up’ button.

“Why? Simple – I am looking to market my facility and use the testimonials from this program to get more clients. AND – because when I have done this program in the past most people stay on afterwards to become members because they love our facility so much. Consider yourself warned!!
What you get:
Personal custom meal plan to eliminate guesswork
Personal grocery list to save time and money and make it crazy easy
Personal food prep instructions so easy my 12 year old can do it in under 2 hours/wk
42 Done-For-You recipes to follow for the 6 weeks so you never have to ask yourself “what am I going to make tonight?”
Personal accountability coach so it feels like you have a motivated speaker waking you up every morning to get your behind in the gym
3 cutting edge workouts PER WEEK WITH ME AT MY GYM designed to tone your body and jump start your metabolism and give you an explosion of energy.
World class online support group with 24hrs accountability
And much much more….

That being said, this is for MOTIVATED…..”

The complainant viewed the advertisement and signed up for their assessment. When visiting the gym she was advised that she would have to pay €499 to avail of the challenge and lose 4lbs a week for the 6 weeks, i.e. 25lbs in total. As none of this information was contained within the sponsored post she considered it was misleading.

The advertiser said that they run a 6 week challenge from their gym that was launched on Facebook by video and word content. They said that after viewing the video and reading all the content, people are asked if they want to find out more. If they do then they need to click the link within the advert and they then arrive at a landing page where they are told they can register for free.

They said that when consumers register they are brought through a booking service in order to set up a time and day for a free private consultation at their gym. They said that the private consultation consists of an explanation for approximately 25 – 30 minutes about the program, including details of the nutrition plan, recipes, accountability, training, weekly measurements, targets of 25lbs or 6% body fat and cost etc. They said that therefore everyone was in no doubt of what the programme entailed in every aspect before starting.

They said that the challenge itself was based on the individual and if someone had more weight to lose they set them a target of 25lbs or if they have not, then their target was 6% body fat as they have to be realistic for them to achieve their goal in the 6 weeks. They also said that as they really want to motivate them, they offered their money back when they hit their target. They said that they currently had 20 people taking part in the challenge and they would be refunding some members who had achieved their goal.

The Complaints Committee considered the detail of the complaint and the advertisers’ response. The Committee noted that the sponsored post on Facebook had specifically referred to the 6 week challenge as being ‘Free’, explaining that it would generate testimonials for the gym The noted however that it was actually a ‘money-back’ offer dependent on achieving a goal, rather than an unconditional ‘free’ offer. They noted that this was not clear from the advertising, with the complainant only being made aware of the terms when attending the initial consultation at the gym. In the circumstances the Committee considered that the advertising was likely to mislead and in breach of Sections 4.1 and 4.4 of the Code.

ACTION REQUIRED:
The advertising must not reappear in its current form.


Health & Beauty

A sponsored post for Full Body Workhouse appeared on Facebook stated:
Free 6 week challenge
I’m looking for 40 ladies who are looking to transform their bodies and lives in 6 weeks for FREE.”
A link to a website was provided and also included was a video of a member of the gym and a ‘sign up’ button.

“Why? Simple – I am looking to market my facility and use the testimonials from this program to get more clients. AND – because when I have done this program in the past most people stay on afterwards to become members because they love our facility so much. Consider yourself warned!!
What you get:
Personal custom meal plan to eliminate guesswork
Personal grocery list to save time and money and make it crazy easy
Personal food prep instructions so easy my 12 year old can do it in under 2 hours/wk
42 Done-For-You recipes to follow for the 6 weeks so you never have to ask yourself “what am I going to make tonight?”
Personal accountability coach so it feels like you have a motivated speaker waking you up every morning to get your behind in the gym
3 cutting edge workouts PER WEEK WITH ME AT MY GYM designed to tone your body and jump start your metabolism and give you an explosion of energy.
World class online support group with 24hrs accountability
And much much more….

That being said, this is for MOTIVATED…..”

The complainant viewed the advertisement and signed up for their assessment. When visiting the gym she was advised that she would have to pay €499 to avail of the challenge and lose 4lbs a week for the 6 weeks, i.e. 25lbs in total. As none of this information was contained within the sponsored post she considered it was misleading.

The advertiser said that they run a 6 week challenge from their gym that was launched on Facebook by video and word content. They said that after viewing the video and reading all the content, people are asked if they want to find out more. If they do then they need to click the link within the advert and they then arrive at a landing page where they are told they can register for free.

They said that when consumers register they are brought through a booking service in order to set up a time and day for a free private consultation at their gym. They said that the private consultation consists of an explanation for approximately 25 – 30 minutes about the program, including details of the nutrition plan, recipes, accountability, training, weekly measurements, targets of 25lbs or 6% body fat and cost etc. They said that therefore everyone was in no doubt of what the programme entailed in every aspect before starting.

They said that the challenge itself was based on the individual and if someone had more weight to lose they set them a target of 25lbs or if they have not, then their target was 6% body fat as they have to be realistic for them to achieve their goal in the 6 weeks. They also said that as they really want to motivate them, they offered their money back when they hit their target. They said that they currently had 20 people taking part in the challenge and they would be refunding some members who had achieved their goal.

The Complaints Committee considered the detail of the complaint and the advertisers’ response. The Committee noted that the sponsored post on Facebook had specifically referred to the 6 week challenge as being ‘Free’, explaining that it would generate testimonials for the gym The noted however that it was actually a ‘money-back’ offer dependent on achieving a goal, rather than an unconditional ‘free’ offer. They noted that this was not clear from the advertising, with the complainant only being made aware of the terms when attending the initial consultation at the gym. In the circumstances the Committee considered that the advertising was likely to mislead and in breach of Sections 4.1 and 4.4 of the Code.

ACTION REQUIRED:
The advertising must not reappear in its current form.


Health & Beauty

A sponsored post for Full Body Workhouse appeared on Facebook stated:
Free 6 week challenge
I’m looking for 40 ladies who are looking to transform their bodies and lives in 6 weeks for FREE.”
A link to a website was provided and also included was a video of a member of the gym and a ‘sign up’ button.

“Why? Simple – I am looking to market my facility and use the testimonials from this program to get more clients. AND – because when I have done this program in the past most people stay on afterwards to become members because they love our facility so much. Consider yourself warned!!
What you get:
Personal custom meal plan to eliminate guesswork
Personal grocery list to save time and money and make it crazy easy
Personal food prep instructions so easy my 12 year old can do it in under 2 hours/wk
42 Done-For-You recipes to follow for the 6 weeks so you never have to ask yourself “what am I going to make tonight?”
Personal accountability coach so it feels like you have a motivated speaker waking you up every morning to get your behind in the gym
3 cutting edge workouts PER WEEK WITH ME AT MY GYM designed to tone your body and jump start your metabolism and give you an explosion of energy.
World class online support group with 24hrs accountability
And much much more….

That being said, this is for MOTIVATED…..”

The complainant viewed the advertisement and signed up for their assessment. When visiting the gym she was advised that she would have to pay €499 to avail of the challenge and lose 4lbs a week for the 6 weeks, i.e. 25lbs in total. As none of this information was contained within the sponsored post she considered it was misleading.

The advertiser said that they run a 6 week challenge from their gym that was launched on Facebook by video and word content. They said that after viewing the video and reading all the content, people are asked if they want to find out more. If they do then they need to click the link within the advert and they then arrive at a landing page where they are told they can register for free.

They said that when consumers register they are brought through a booking service in order to set up a time and day for a free private consultation at their gym. They said that the private consultation consists of an explanation for approximately 25 – 30 minutes about the program, including details of the nutrition plan, recipes, accountability, training, weekly measurements, targets of 25lbs or 6% body fat and cost etc. They said that therefore everyone was in no doubt of what the programme entailed in every aspect before starting.

They said that the challenge itself was based on the individual and if someone had more weight to lose they set them a target of 25lbs or if they have not, then their target was 6% body fat as they have to be realistic for them to achieve their goal in the 6 weeks. They also said that as they really want to motivate them, they offered their money back when they hit their target. They said that they currently had 20 people taking part in the challenge and they would be refunding some members who had achieved their goal.

The Complaints Committee considered the detail of the complaint and the advertisers’ response. The Committee noted that the sponsored post on Facebook had specifically referred to the 6 week challenge as being ‘Free’, explaining that it would generate testimonials for the gym The noted however that it was actually a ‘money-back’ offer dependent on achieving a goal, rather than an unconditional ‘free’ offer. They noted that this was not clear from the advertising, with the complainant only being made aware of the terms when attending the initial consultation at the gym. In the circumstances the Committee considered that the advertising was likely to mislead and in breach of Sections 4.1 and 4.4 of the Code.

ACTION REQUIRED:
The advertising must not reappear in its current form.


Health & Beauty

A sponsored post for Full Body Workhouse appeared on Facebook stated:
Free 6 week challenge
I’m looking for 40 ladies who are looking to transform their bodies and lives in 6 weeks for FREE.”
A link to a website was provided and also included was a video of a member of the gym and a ‘sign up’ button.

“Why? Simple – I am looking to market my facility and use the testimonials from this program to get more clients. AND – because when I have done this program in the past most people stay on afterwards to become members because they love our facility so much. Consider yourself warned!!
What you get:
Personal custom meal plan to eliminate guesswork
Personal grocery list to save time and money and make it crazy easy
Personal food prep instructions so easy my 12 year old can do it in under 2 hours/wk
42 Done-For-You recipes to follow for the 6 weeks so you never have to ask yourself “what am I going to make tonight?”
Personal accountability coach so it feels like you have a motivated speaker waking you up every morning to get your behind in the gym
3 cutting edge workouts PER WEEK WITH ME AT MY GYM designed to tone your body and jump start your metabolism and give you an explosion of energy.
World class online support group with 24hrs accountability
And much much more….

That being said, this is for MOTIVATED…..”

The complainant viewed the advertisement and signed up for their assessment. When visiting the gym she was advised that she would have to pay €499 to avail of the challenge and lose 4lbs a week for the 6 weeks, i.e. 25lbs in total. As none of this information was contained within the sponsored post she considered it was misleading.

The advertiser said that they run a 6 week challenge from their gym that was launched on Facebook by video and word content. They said that after viewing the video and reading all the content, people are asked if they want to find out more. If they do then they need to click the link within the advert and they then arrive at a landing page where they are told they can register for free.

They said that when consumers register they are brought through a booking service in order to set up a time and day for a free private consultation at their gym. They said that the private consultation consists of an explanation for approximately 25 – 30 minutes about the program, including details of the nutrition plan, recipes, accountability, training, weekly measurements, targets of 25lbs or 6% body fat and cost etc. They said that therefore everyone was in no doubt of what the programme entailed in every aspect before starting.

They said that the challenge itself was based on the individual and if someone had more weight to lose they set them a target of 25lbs or if they have not, then their target was 6% body fat as they have to be realistic for them to achieve their goal in the 6 weeks. They also said that as they really want to motivate them, they offered their money back when they hit their target. They said that they currently had 20 people taking part in the challenge and they would be refunding some members who had achieved their goal.

The Complaints Committee considered the detail of the complaint and the advertisers’ response. The Committee noted that the sponsored post on Facebook had specifically referred to the 6 week challenge as being ‘Free’, explaining that it would generate testimonials for the gym The noted however that it was actually a ‘money-back’ offer dependent on achieving a goal, rather than an unconditional ‘free’ offer. They noted that this was not clear from the advertising, with the complainant only being made aware of the terms when attending the initial consultation at the gym. In the circumstances the Committee considered that the advertising was likely to mislead and in breach of Sections 4.1 and 4.4 of the Code.

ACTION REQUIRED:
The advertising must not reappear in its current form.


Health & Beauty

A sponsored post for Full Body Workhouse appeared on Facebook stated:
Free 6 week challenge
I’m looking for 40 ladies who are looking to transform their bodies and lives in 6 weeks for FREE.”
A link to a website was provided and also included was a video of a member of the gym and a ‘sign up’ button.

“Why? Simple – I am looking to market my facility and use the testimonials from this program to get more clients. AND – because when I have done this program in the past most people stay on afterwards to become members because they love our facility so much. Consider yourself warned!!
What you get:
Personal custom meal plan to eliminate guesswork
Personal grocery list to save time and money and make it crazy easy
Personal food prep instructions so easy my 12 year old can do it in under 2 hours/wk
42 Done-For-You recipes to follow for the 6 weeks so you never have to ask yourself “what am I going to make tonight?”
Personal accountability coach so it feels like you have a motivated speaker waking you up every morning to get your behind in the gym
3 cutting edge workouts PER WEEK WITH ME AT MY GYM designed to tone your body and jump start your metabolism and give you an explosion of energy.
World class online support group with 24hrs accountability
And much much more….

That being said, this is for MOTIVATED…..”

The complainant viewed the advertisement and signed up for their assessment. When visiting the gym she was advised that she would have to pay €499 to avail of the challenge and lose 4lbs a week for the 6 weeks, i.e. 25lbs in total. As none of this information was contained within the sponsored post she considered it was misleading.

The advertiser said that they run a 6 week challenge from their gym that was launched on Facebook by video and word content. They said that after viewing the video and reading all the content, people are asked if they want to find out more. If they do then they need to click the link within the advert and they then arrive at a landing page where they are told they can register for free.

They said that when consumers register they are brought through a booking service in order to set up a time and day for a free private consultation at their gym. They said that the private consultation consists of an explanation for approximately 25 – 30 minutes about the program, including details of the nutrition plan, recipes, accountability, training, weekly measurements, targets of 25lbs or 6% body fat and cost etc. They said that therefore everyone was in no doubt of what the programme entailed in every aspect before starting.

They said that the challenge itself was based on the individual and if someone had more weight to lose they set them a target of 25lbs or if they have not, then their target was 6% body fat as they have to be realistic for them to achieve their goal in the 6 weeks. They also said that as they really want to motivate them, they offered their money back when they hit their target. They said that they currently had 20 people taking part in the challenge and they would be refunding some members who had achieved their goal.

The Complaints Committee considered the detail of the complaint and the advertisers’ response. The Committee noted that the sponsored post on Facebook had specifically referred to the 6 week challenge as being ‘Free’, explaining that it would generate testimonials for the gym The noted however that it was actually a ‘money-back’ offer dependent on achieving a goal, rather than an unconditional ‘free’ offer. They noted that this was not clear from the advertising, with the complainant only being made aware of the terms when attending the initial consultation at the gym. In the circumstances the Committee considered that the advertising was likely to mislead and in breach of Sections 4.1 and 4.4 of the Code.

ACTION REQUIRED:
The advertising must not reappear in its current form.


Health & Beauty

A sponsored post for Full Body Workhouse appeared on Facebook stated:
Free 6 week challenge
I’m looking for 40 ladies who are looking to transform their bodies and lives in 6 weeks for FREE.”
A link to a website was provided and also included was a video of a member of the gym and a ‘sign up’ button.

“Why? Simple – I am looking to market my facility and use the testimonials from this program to get more clients. AND – because when I have done this program in the past most people stay on afterwards to become members because they love our facility so much. Consider yourself warned!!
What you get:
Personal custom meal plan to eliminate guesswork
Personal grocery list to save time and money and make it crazy easy
Personal food prep instructions so easy my 12 year old can do it in under 2 hours/wk
42 Done-For-You recipes to follow for the 6 weeks so you never have to ask yourself “what am I going to make tonight?”
Personal accountability coach so it feels like you have a motivated speaker waking you up every morning to get your behind in the gym
3 cutting edge workouts PER WEEK WITH ME AT MY GYM designed to tone your body and jump start your metabolism and give you an explosion of energy.
World class online support group with 24hrs accountability
And much much more….

That being said, this is for MOTIVATED…..”

The complainant viewed the advertisement and signed up for their assessment. When visiting the gym she was advised that she would have to pay €499 to avail of the challenge and lose 4lbs a week for the 6 weeks, i.e. 25lbs in total. As none of this information was contained within the sponsored post she considered it was misleading.

The advertiser said that they run a 6 week challenge from their gym that was launched on Facebook by video and word content. They said that after viewing the video and reading all the content, people are asked if they want to find out more. If they do then they need to click the link within the advert and they then arrive at a landing page where they are told they can register for free.

They said that when consumers register they are brought through a booking service in order to set up a time and day for a free private consultation at their gym. They said that the private consultation consists of an explanation for approximately 25 – 30 minutes about the program, including details of the nutrition plan, recipes, accountability, training, weekly measurements, targets of 25lbs or 6% body fat and cost etc. They said that therefore everyone was in no doubt of what the programme entailed in every aspect before starting.

They said that the challenge itself was based on the individual and if someone had more weight to lose they set them a target of 25lbs or if they have not, then their target was 6% body fat as they have to be realistic for them to achieve their goal in the 6 weeks. They also said that as they really want to motivate them, they offered their money back when they hit their target. They said that they currently had 20 people taking part in the challenge and they would be refunding some members who had achieved their goal.

The Complaints Committee considered the detail of the complaint and the advertisers’ response. The Committee noted that the sponsored post on Facebook had specifically referred to the 6 week challenge as being ‘Free’, explaining that it would generate testimonials for the gym The noted however that it was actually a ‘money-back’ offer dependent on achieving a goal, rather than an unconditional ‘free’ offer. They noted that this was not clear from the advertising, with the complainant only being made aware of the terms when attending the initial consultation at the gym. In the circumstances the Committee considered that the advertising was likely to mislead and in breach of Sections 4.1 and 4.4 of the Code.

ACTION REQUIRED:
The advertising must not reappear in its current form.


Health & Beauty

A sponsored post for Full Body Workhouse appeared on Facebook stated:
Free 6 week challenge
I’m looking for 40 ladies who are looking to transform their bodies and lives in 6 weeks for FREE.”
A link to a website was provided and also included was a video of a member of the gym and a ‘sign up’ button.

“Why? Simple – I am looking to market my facility and use the testimonials from this program to get more clients. AND – because when I have done this program in the past most people stay on afterwards to become members because they love our facility so much. Consider yourself warned!!
What you get:
Personal custom meal plan to eliminate guesswork
Personal grocery list to save time and money and make it crazy easy
Personal food prep instructions so easy my 12 year old can do it in under 2 hours/wk
42 Done-For-You recipes to follow for the 6 weeks so you never have to ask yourself “what am I going to make tonight?”
Personal accountability coach so it feels like you have a motivated speaker waking you up every morning to get your behind in the gym
3 cutting edge workouts PER WEEK WITH ME AT MY GYM designed to tone your body and jump start your metabolism and give you an explosion of energy.
World class online support group with 24hrs accountability
And much much more….

That being said, this is for MOTIVATED…..”

The complainant viewed the advertisement and signed up for their assessment. When visiting the gym she was advised that she would have to pay €499 to avail of the challenge and lose 4lbs a week for the 6 weeks, i.e. 25lbs in total. As none of this information was contained within the sponsored post she considered it was misleading.

The advertiser said that they run a 6 week challenge from their gym that was launched on Facebook by video and word content. They said that after viewing the video and reading all the content, people are asked if they want to find out more. If they do then they need to click the link within the advert and they then arrive at a landing page where they are told they can register for free.

They said that when consumers register they are brought through a booking service in order to set up a time and day for a free private consultation at their gym. They said that the private consultation consists of an explanation for approximately 25 – 30 minutes about the program, including details of the nutrition plan, recipes, accountability, training, weekly measurements, targets of 25lbs or 6% body fat and cost etc. They said that therefore everyone was in no doubt of what the programme entailed in every aspect before starting.

They said that the challenge itself was based on the individual and if someone had more weight to lose they set them a target of 25lbs or if they have not, then their target was 6% body fat as they have to be realistic for them to achieve their goal in the 6 weeks. They also said that as they really want to motivate them, they offered their money back when they hit their target. They said that they currently had 20 people taking part in the challenge and they would be refunding some members who had achieved their goal.

The Complaints Committee considered the detail of the complaint and the advertisers’ response. The Committee noted that the sponsored post on Facebook had specifically referred to the 6 week challenge as being ‘Free’, explaining that it would generate testimonials for the gym The noted however that it was actually a ‘money-back’ offer dependent on achieving a goal, rather than an unconditional ‘free’ offer. They noted that this was not clear from the advertising, with the complainant only being made aware of the terms when attending the initial consultation at the gym. In the circumstances the Committee considered that the advertising was likely to mislead and in breach of Sections 4.1 and 4.4 of the Code.

ACTION REQUIRED:
The advertising must not reappear in its current form.


Health & Beauty

A sponsored post for Full Body Workhouse appeared on Facebook stated:
Free 6 week challenge
I’m looking for 40 ladies who are looking to transform their bodies and lives in 6 weeks for FREE.”
A link to a website was provided and also included was a video of a member of the gym and a ‘sign up’ button.

“Why? Simple – I am looking to market my facility and use the testimonials from this program to get more clients. AND – because when I have done this program in the past most people stay on afterwards to become members because they love our facility so much. Consider yourself warned!!
What you get:
Personal custom meal plan to eliminate guesswork
Personal grocery list to save time and money and make it crazy easy
Personal food prep instructions so easy my 12 year old can do it in under 2 hours/wk
42 Done-For-You recipes to follow for the 6 weeks so you never have to ask yourself “what am I going to make tonight?”
Personal accountability coach so it feels like you have a motivated speaker waking you up every morning to get your behind in the gym
3 cutting edge workouts PER WEEK WITH ME AT MY GYM designed to tone your body and jump start your metabolism and give you an explosion of energy.
World class online support group with 24hrs accountability
And much much more….

That being said, this is for MOTIVATED…..”

The complainant viewed the advertisement and signed up for their assessment. When visiting the gym she was advised that she would have to pay €499 to avail of the challenge and lose 4lbs a week for the 6 weeks, i.e. 25lbs in total. As none of this information was contained within the sponsored post she considered it was misleading.

The advertiser said that they run a 6 week challenge from their gym that was launched on Facebook by video and word content. They said that after viewing the video and reading all the content, people are asked if they want to find out more. If they do then they need to click the link within the advert and they then arrive at a landing page where they are told they can register for free.

They said that when consumers register they are brought through a booking service in order to set up a time and day for a free private consultation at their gym. They said that the private consultation consists of an explanation for approximately 25 – 30 minutes about the program, including details of the nutrition plan, recipes, accountability, training, weekly measurements, targets of 25lbs or 6% body fat and cost etc. They said that therefore everyone was in no doubt of what the programme entailed in every aspect before starting.

They said that the challenge itself was based on the individual and if someone had more weight to lose they set them a target of 25lbs or if they have not, then their target was 6% body fat as they have to be realistic for them to achieve their goal in the 6 weeks. They also said that as they really want to motivate them, they offered their money back when they hit their target. They said that they currently had 20 people taking part in the challenge and they would be refunding some members who had achieved their goal.

The Complaints Committee considered the detail of the complaint and the advertisers’ response. The Committee noted that the sponsored post on Facebook had specifically referred to the 6 week challenge as being ‘Free’, explaining that it would generate testimonials for the gym The noted however that it was actually a ‘money-back’ offer dependent on achieving a goal, rather than an unconditional ‘free’ offer. They noted that this was not clear from the advertising, with the complainant only being made aware of the terms when attending the initial consultation at the gym. In the circumstances the Committee considered that the advertising was likely to mislead and in breach of Sections 4.1 and 4.4 of the Code.

ACTION REQUIRED:
The advertising must not reappear in its current form.


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